Canberra Agreement 1947

1 South Sea Commission Conference Paper P/18, 6 February 1947. The documents of William Douglass Forsyth (1909-1993) contain much material on the establishment of the Secretariat in 1947 and the first twenty years of the South Pacific Commission. Documents include agenda documents, reports, correspondence, work programmes, speeches, newsletters and photos. Forsyth maintained a keen interest in the Pacific throughout his life and the collection contains later documents on the South Pacific Conference and a manuscript he wrote in 1971-73 entitled “Post-Colonial Pacific”. His unpublished memoirs are also an important source for the South Pacific Commission. The Canberra Pact was greeted with hostility by the United Kingdom and the United States. The British saw this as a highlight of their loss of influence in the region, while the Americans, now the dominant power in the Pacific, were furious that they had not been consulted. Even their promise of closer cooperation between Australia and New Zealand has largely not been kept. But the two countries were closely associated with the creation of the United Nations and a South Pacific Commission was established in 1947. While the acronym “SSC” has been consistent since the organizations were founded in 1947, the name and logo have evolved over the years. The original name of the organization was the South Pacific Commission, which represented the limited nature of its membership and activities. The name was changed to the Pacific Community in 1997, reflecting the growth in membership throughout the Pacific region.

The current logo was officially taken over in 2015. The Pacific Community was established in 1947 as the South Pacific Commission of six developed countries with strategic interests and territories in the region: Australia, France, the Netherlands, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States. [4] The South Pacific Commission was established in 1947, when six industrialized countries with a strong interest in the Pacific signed the Canberra Agreement. These were Australia, France, the Netherlands, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States. .

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